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Justin Gerard

Justin Gerard is the man. We played soccer together in college, or I should say he played soccer and I watched from the bench. One time, he said I was his favorite freshman, so I got all kinds of warm fuzzies. I was just a graphic designer, but Justin was a real artist and used real pencils and stuff instead of pixels and vectors. And he's still pretty good with those pencils even though he is working digitally now.



Justin's gallery and main website.

Justin is an owner over at Portland Studios, and I commissioned Justin to do two fonts for insigne, Biscuit Boodle and the new Biscuit Boodle Ornaments. You can grab both for 20% off their regular price at MyFonts for a limited time.

Be sure to check Justin's blog for some interesting information about his illustration process.

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