Tuesday, April 8, 2014

Oita, a octagonal typeface.



Oita might be a carefully crafted typeface family, created by a meat-bag human.


Or, it might have been made by a supremely clever sentient robot.

Found in the dark recesses of a top secret spy agencies quantum computer, this font came with this somewhat unusual description, which is presented without comment.



“To conquer, we cannot simply overcome. Success is found in supremacy--in the dominance of Oita.

While looking for the right tool for this success, our research has led us to the finely executed forms found of military domination throughout history. In our labs, we’ve used our specialized machines to harness these forms’ power and refined their impact through elements of contemporary and computer design. The structure proves to be robotic and squared on its edges. However, the chutzpah of this technical face still allows it to pass as if created by human hands.













Our resulting payload, Oita, is modern and sturdy. While based on a practical, octagonal structure, make no mistake; this new instrument will drive forward the energy you want to push through your projects. Oita has 42 cuts certain to encompass your designs on world domination. Each font contains the glyphs to support over 52 languages. The font also includes tabular and lining figures, numerous ligatures, and selected advanced Opentype options, including stencil and experimental options to bring out the dynamic characteristics that have already been crafted into Oita.


Early tests have found that the new instrument is easily scalable to smaller dimensions without reducing its impact. The font remains highly readable across a variety of applications. We speculate from our findings that it will be successful for sporting and technical applications.”


So for you who venture to use Oita, use it boldly. Don’t just overcome. Dominate. Go and conquer mightily with Oita. We’ll be watching.”


We may never know whether Oita hails from mind or mechanism. What we do know is that, should you choose to take on Oita, you'll be acquiring a dynamic poster and packaging face, a minigun-toting bad robot of a font that exudes pace and power.


Tuesday, March 4, 2014

Introducing Cabrito Inverto: Life’s always more fun when you reverse the stress.








Introducing Cabrito Inverto: Life’s always more fun when you reverse the stress.


Life’s always more fun when you reverse the stress. The same goes for the new member of the Cabrito family. Cabrito itself is a recently developed slab serif made for the kid’s book The Clothes Letters Wear. Cabrito proved to be more popular than I thought, and I promised I would create an inverted style for this new addition to the font world--a variant that would pair well with the original or even stand well on its own.


And so now, here it is. Cabrito Inverto, which features the reversed stress of the strokes from a font’s “normal” traits. Inverted stress fonts are most often associated with cowboys and the Old West. The inverted stress gives it a happy-go-lucky appearance, not to be taken too seriously. It's a pleasantly rounded, not-so-strictly geometric typeface with handwriting-inspired forms. Whew, that’s a mouthful!


Inverto’s bundle of alternates is accessible in any OpenType-enabled program. It contains a workforce of alternates, swashes, and alternate titling caps to embellish the font. Also bundled are swash alternates, aged design and style figures, and compact caps. Peruse the PDF brochure to examine out these solutions in action. OpenType-enabled purposes such as Adobe suite or Quark will allow ligatures and alternates. This font family also includes the glyphs for 72 different languages.

Cabrito Inverto does pair well with Cabrito. There is even an extra font weight, Black, for when you want to punch it up a bit. Jeremy Dooley designed Inverto to be a welcoming, day-to-day font family. Use it to express friendliness on just about anything, from candy to food to children’s toys. Cabrito Inverto's one-of-a-kind visual appearance brings a bundle of fun to the party. Buy Cabrito Inverto to give a boost to your designs every day of the week.

77% off for a limited time!






Tuesday, February 11, 2014

Introducing Ainslie, a semi-serif inspired by the culture of Australia.












Get your Aussie on! The new typeface, Ainslie, with its mix of influences from Oz, makes its mark as the first semi-serif from insigne Design.

Ainslie, named for Mt. Ainslie and Canberra’s inner suburb of the same name, was originally developed for the Canberra Australia Centennial Typeface Competition. Canberra is Australia’s capital, and It’s a planned city designed by American Walter Burley Griffin, a contemporary and one-time associate of Frank Lloyd Wright. Griffin’s plan involved a distinctly geometric design with several focal points--one of which was Mt. Ainslie. This same purely geometric scheme is now the basis for insigne’s new release.

Similar to the Chatype project in its scope, its challenge, and the way its concept was developed, Ainslie incorporates influences from Canberra and surrounding areas to form a font that is uniquely Australian. In comparison, Chatype was developed for the city of Chattanooga, Tennessee by insigne in conjunction with designer Robbie de Villiers. Chatype took elements from Chattanooga’s industrial character and Cherokee past and merged them with the area’s technological influences.

Likewise, Ainslie takes Canberra’s distinct, geometric design and blends it with the organic, flowing effect of aboriginal art. Add in touches from the smooth, aerodynamic design of the boomerang and Ainslie gives you a look uniquely Australian yet usable in a wide range of applications.

The fashionable typeface includes a multitude of alternates that can be accessed in any OpenType-enabled application. These stylish alternates along with a number of swashes as well as meticulously refined details with ball terminals and alternate titling caps keep the font well accessorized. Also included are capital swash alternates, old style figures, and small caps. Peruse the PDF brochure to see these features in action. OpenType enabled applications such as the Adobe suite or Quark can take full advantage of the automatic replacing ligatures and alternates. This family also offers the glyphs to support a wide range of languages.

While Ainslie wasn’t selected as the final font in the Canberra competition, the outcome allowed for additional adjustments to the typeface. Several approaches were attempted for the final product including a technological hexagonal concept, which may still be developed to another form later. Some of the organic forms were removed and substituted with more abrupt endings, leaving the face looking pretty spiffy and a fair bit more legible. In the end, Ainslie was pulled back to the basic forms from which it was started.

Give it a go for your next project. It’s guaranteed to be anything but a barbecue stopper.

77% off for a limited time!


Tuesday, January 14, 2014

Introducing Aviano Gothic, the latest in the Aviano hyperfamily.



The Aviano collection returns, refined into a new, mid-contrast sans-serif inspired by the design and style of early 1900’s American engravers. Historically, these engravers meticulously carved lettering into copper printing plates, often using only capitals for greater impact to the reader. While taking inspiration from the past engravings, Aviano Gothic is not an attempt to revive an older design but is a distinctly one-of-a-kind form based on the structure of its Aviano predecessors for maximum interchangeability and interoperability. Aviano Gothic has been diligently honed to be sinuous and seductive, making it great for high-end work such as including jewelry, beauty, and other luxury products.







The full Aviano Gothic family presents you with six distinct weights and is full of OpenType options. Available with the face are deco alternates for replicating inscriptions and signage of the ’20s and ’30s. Style sets are offered, together with four full sets of art deco-inspired alternates, swashes, and titling, in addition to an expansive range of other alternates to help “unique-ify” your layouts. Aviano Gothic also features forty discretionary ligatures for inventive typographic compositions. Begin planning your work with Aviano Gothic by looking at these options in the instructive .pdf brochure.

OpenType-able applications, including Quark or the Adobe suite, allow for the comprehensive benefit of the ligatures and alternates. This typeface also features the glyphs to aid a broad number of languages.

Several variants have been made to extend the usefulness of the typeface, and it makes for a fine substitute for Copperplate, ITC Blair or Engravers Gothic. As referenced, too, Aviano Gothic also pairs perfectly with the other members of the Aviano collection, including the original Aviano, Aviano Serif, Aviano Sans, Aviano Didone, Aviano Flare, Aviano Future, Aviano Wedge, Aviano Contrast, and Aviano Slab.



Friday, December 20, 2013

Introducing Cabrito, incorporating the latest research on typographic legibility for children.




After my son was born, I found myself reading him a lot of books. A LOT of books.

Some were good, some were great, but I found myself wanting to develop something using my skills and interests to make something that only I could make. In short, I realized my son needed to be indoctrinated--I mean, introduced into the wonderfully wild world of fonts.




So, I set about to make a board book to teach about typography, called “The Clothes Letters Wear.” You can learn more about the book here, and pledge to receive a copy on Kickstarter. I’ve made the captivating illustrations bright and colorful, and the use of different letter forms makes for a fascinating read to delight ages young and young at heart.

And, as an added bonus, this children’s book has a custom designed font. I’m always looking for an excuse to design a new font, and this book created the perfect alibi.

Drum roll, please.

I now give you . . . Cabrito (“little goat” en Espanol). This new serif typeface incorporates the latest research on typographic legibility for children, features to make it--well, extra legible. A little background: studies show that Bookman Old Style is one of the most readable typefaces, and as a consequence or perhaps the reason why, it is used thoroughly for children’s books. This font became my initial inspiration for the typeface. Then, I found more legibility research saying that (brace yourselves) Comic Sans is also very legible for beginning readers, much due to the large x-height and softer, easily recognizable forms. In addition, forms that are closer to handwriting also seem to be more legible. Once I threw all that into my cauldron and stewed it a bit, the result was a pleasantly rounded typeface that includes not-so-strictly geometric, handwriting-inspired forms for the b, d, p, and q. Es guapo!





Cabrito's slender weights are simple and fun, with extras that turn any “bah humbug” into a smile. Add lighter touches to your project with the typeface’s included sparkles or rainbows (not included). Splash a little more color on the page with the firmer look of the thicker weights. Cabrito's upright variations across all weights are matched by optically altered italics, too, giving you even more variety with the font family.


This modern typeface’s bundle of alternates can be accessed in any OpenType-enabled software. The fashionable options involve a significant team of alternates, swashes, and meticulously refined aspects with ball terminals and alternate titling caps to decorate the font. Also bundled are swash alternates, old style figures, and small caps. Peruse the PDF brochure to check out these options in motion. OpenType-enabled applications like the Adobe suite or Quark allows comprehensive control of ligatures and alternates. This font family also provides the glyphs to aid a variety of languages.


Cabrito is a welcoming, everyday font family by Jeremy Dooley. Use it to convey warmth and friendliness on anything from candy and food packages to children’s toys, company IDs or run-of-the-mill promotional material. Cabrito's unique appearance and high legibility make it equally at home in print as it is on a screen.

Thursday, December 19, 2013

A Dad's Labor of Love



Hello Friends,

I hope you're having an awesome day. Thanks again for your loyalty to insigne fonts. I truly could not do it without you.

As a typeface designer, I occasionally get the itch to do something different. So here it is. I thought you might find it interesting.


It’s a board book for young children, designed to teach the little ones all about the fonts that surround them. This book is designed to be something you and your child will treasure for many years and bring the alphabet to life for your little one.





It's a kickstarter, so I can’t do this without you. The design’s ready to go, and we’re just about to start production. I now need your help to get The Clothes Letters Wear produced and into your child’s hands (and like my son Will, in your child’s mouth, too). This book is designed for you and your child to treasure for many years. We’d like you to join us in making all this possible.

Pledge to produce The Clothes Letters Wear